This Month in (Sort of) Literary History

December 3, 1857: Joseph Conrad (Józef Teodor Konrad Nalecz Korzeniowski), author of Lord Jim and Heart of Darkness, is born. December 6, 1975: Paul Simon’s album, Still Crazy After All These Years, is number one in the U.S. December 6, 1886: Joyce (Alfred) Kilmer, poet, writer of “Trees,” is born. December 6, 1920: Jazz musician Dave Brubeck is
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September 1, 1875: Edgar Rice Burroughs, author of Tarzan of the Apes, is born in Chicago, Illinois. September 4, 1959: The song “Mack the Knife” is banned from radio–at least from WCBS Radio in New York City. September 4, 1908: Richard Wright, author of Black Boy, is born on the Rucker plantation in Roxie, Mississippi.
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August 1, 1940: The first book written by 23-year-old John Fitzgerald Kennedy, Why England Slept, is published August 1, 1944: 13-year-old Anne Frank makes the last entry in her diary, a diary she kept for two years while hiding with her family to escape Nazi deportation to a concentration camp. August 1, 1819: Herman Melville,
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This Week in History: Week of September 19

September 23, 1949: Bruce Springsteen, singer and songwriter of “Born in the U.S.A.,” “Born to Run,” “Hungry Heart,” and “Jungleland,” is born in Long Branch, New Jersey. September 19, 1819: John Keats writes one of the best-loved English poems, Ode to Autumn. September 19, 1974: Eric Clapton receives a gold record for “I Shot the
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This Week in History: Week of August 29

August 29, 1964: Roy Orbison’s “(Oh) Pretty Woman” is released. August 29, 1966: The Beatles perform at Candlestick Park in San Francisco, CA. It is the group’s last live appearance before they disband in 1970. August 30, 1968: The Beatles record their first songs for their own Apple label. The initial session includes the hits
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